Authors Answer 24 – Brushing up on Grammar

Before I start, I want to share this:

Ignore the static picture, it’s just the song. It’s fecking awesome and one of my all-time favourites.

This has absolutely nothing to do with today’s question, but I felt like I had to share.

To be fair, I could probably use the filler today, because the question is this: How important is it to you to continue learning and brushing up on basic skills such as grammar? For instance, would you pay to take a course?

The simple answer is no, I don’t need it.

If that sounds incredibly arrogant, well, sue me. It’s a fact universally acknowledged among my colleagues that, even though I’m a foreigner, my English skills are better than most of theirs (if not all). I’m not infallible, but I do a better job than the in-built grammar checker in Word, and I’m a pretty damn good spellchecker as well.

Don’t confuse this with me thinking such skills are not important. There are few things more incessantly annoying than a book with oodles of spelling errors, and any self-published author with such a book to their name should be ashamed of themselves. I’m just saying that I don’t need any training courses to bring myself up to an acceptable standard, because I’m there already.

That’s just the way it is.

For other authors’ answers, check out Jay Dee’s original post on this matter.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Authors Answer 24 – Brushing up on Grammar

  1. Jay Dee

    I had to check what I said for my answer, and mine was pretty similar to yours. Considering I was teaching English at the time, I didn’t need any help to improve my grammar or spelling.

    Reply
    1. Erica Dakin Post author

      Yeah, I saw that. You’d definitely be in trouble if as a teacher you need grammar lessons! I think it’s something to do with English being a foreign language for me. I’m afraid of spelling errors because I fear that people will think that silly old foreign me doesn’t know the correct spelling. Daft, of course, but there you go.

      Reply
      1. Jay Dee

        Eleven years of teaching pounded the rules in my brain, too. I think it’s improved my writing, though I taught conversational English.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s